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Meg Arenberg

Meg Arenberg

Postdoctoral Research Associate, African Humanities

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 166

609-258-4851

arenberg@princeton.edu

Arenberg recently completed her Ph.D. in comparative literature at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her primary research interests focus on multilingual African fiction, poetry and drama of the 20th and 21st centuries, intertextuality between Afrophone and Europhone African literatures and literary translation. While at Princeton she will be preparing a book manuscript on the interrelationship of language ideology, literary form and African identities in contemporary East African literature across the generic spectrum. Her work has been published in Research in African Literatures and is forthcoming in PMLA and East African Literary and Cultural Studies. Arenberg also translates from Swahili language and is currently at work on an English translation of Zanzibari poet Mohammed Ghassani’s award-winning collection, N’na Kwetu. 

Lai-Ha Chan

Lai-Ha Chan

Fung Global Fellow, Visiting Research Scholar

Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 156

609-258-3351

laihac@princeton.edu

Chan is a senior lecturer in the Social and Political Sciences Program, School of Communication, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Australia. Her research focuses on China and global governance, including issues ranging from global health, peace and security, environmental protection, global financial order, military intervention, to development aid. At Princeton, she will primarily study the impact of the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) on the guiding principles of global development assistance, with particular focus on how far China can reshape the conception of the ‘normal’ in the area of foreign aid governance. Ph.D. in international and Asian studies, Griffith University, Australia.

Martin Dimitrov

Martin Dimitrov

Visiting Research Scholar

Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 158

609-258-9864

martinkd@princeton.edu

Dimitrov is an associateprofessor of political science at Tulane University and the associate editor for Asia of Problems of Post-Communism. His books include Piracy and the State: The Politics of Intellectual Property Rights in China (Cambridge University Press, 2009); Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2013); and The Politics of Socialist Consumption (Ciela Publishers, 2017). He has conducted fieldwork in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Russia, Germany, France, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria and Cuba and has received residential fellowships from the American Academy in Berlin; the Aleksanteri Institute at the University of Helsinki; the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard; the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard; and the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford. At PIIRS in 2016-2017, he will be completing a book manuscript entitled Dictatorship and Information: Autocratic Regime Resilience in Communist Europe and China and two edited volumes: China-Cuba: Trajectories of Post-Revolutionary Governance and Popular Authoritarianism: The Quest for Regime Durability.

Hao Dong

Hao Dong

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Center on Contemporary China, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

haodong@princeton.edu

Hao Dong earned his Ph.D. and MPhil in social science from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and LLB in Sociology from Zhejiang University. His research interests include social demography, family and kinship, and social mobility and inequality. In his recent works, he makes use of five recently available longitudinal datasets of some 4 million observations of 650,000 individuals, who lived between 18th and mid-20th century in northeast China, northeast Japan, southeast Korea, and north Taiwan, to compare the influence of social context and family structure on individuals throughout the life course.

Antoinette Handley

Antoinette Handley

PIIRS Visiting Research Scholar

World Politics, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Aaron Burr Hall, Office 330

ahandley@Princeton.EDU

Handley is currently an associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto where she teaches comparative, developing country politics, including African politics and government, African political economy and the politics of epidemics. Prior to her current position, Handley served as the director of studies at the South African Institute of International Affairs in Johannesburg, South Africa, where she led the institute’s research and publications division.Handley’s research focuses on the nature of the private sector, specifically, business as a political actor and the role of these actors in the political economy of development more broadly. More recently, her work has focused on how African economic elites respond to moments of national social or political crisis. One such crisis that she examines is the wide-ranging and devastating impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in certain Southern and East African countries; another is presented in moments of national political turmoil and violence. Her work considers why, in some instances, business, often at some considerable cost to itself, seeks to play a key role in resolving the crisis in question, while in other instances, firms attempt much more narrowly to simply insulate themselves from the costs of the crisis, doing little or nothing to resolve it.

While at Princeton, she will be working on a new project: attempting to develop a political economy account of state formation in Africa. This will examine how iterated interactions between particular economic and political elites, and the public and private sector, have shaped the ongoing construction of the state across the continent. She seeks to understand whether the power of political elites and the states that they build is constrained or enabled by the concomitant development—or not—of a dominant economic class.,  Ph.D. in Politics at Princeton.

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