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Meg Arenberg

Meg Arenberg

Postdoctoral Research Associate, African Humanities

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 166

609-258-4851

arenberg@princeton.edu

Arenberg recently completed her Ph.D. in comparative literature at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her primary research interests focus on multilingual African fiction, poetry and drama of the 20th and 21st centuries, intertextuality between Afrophone and Europhone African literatures and literary translation. While at Princeton she will be preparing a book manuscript on the interrelationship of language ideology, literary form and African identities in contemporary East African literature across the generic spectrum. Her work has been published in Research in African Literatures and is forthcoming in PMLA and East African Literary and Cultural Studies. Arenberg also translates from Swahili language and is currently at work on an English translation of Zanzibari poet Mohammed Ghassani’s award-winning collection, N’na Kwetu. 

Martin Dimitrov

Martin Dimitrov

Visiting Research Scholar

Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 158

609-258-9864

martinkd@princeton.edu

Dimitrov is an associateprofessor of political science at Tulane University and the associate editor for Asia of Problems of Post-Communism. His books include Piracy and the State: The Politics of Intellectual Property Rights in China (Cambridge University Press, 2009); Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2013); and The Politics of Socialist Consumption (Ciela Publishers, 2017). He has conducted fieldwork in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Russia, Germany, France, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria and Cuba and has received residential fellowships from the American Academy in Berlin; the Aleksanteri Institute at the University of Helsinki; the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard; the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard; and the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford. At PIIRS in 2016-2017, he will be completing a book manuscript entitled Dictatorship and Information: Autocratic Regime Resilience in Communist Europe and China and two edited volumes: China-Cuba: Trajectories of Post-Revolutionary Governance and Popular Authoritarianism: The Quest for Regime Durability.

Hao Dong

Hao Dong

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Center on Contemporary China, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

haodong@princeton.edu

Hao Dong earned his Ph.D. and MPhil in social science from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and LLB in Sociology from Zhejiang University. His research interests include social demography, family and kinship, and social mobility and inequality. In his recent works, he makes use of five recently available longitudinal datasets of some 4 million observations of 650,000 individuals, who lived between 18th and mid-20th century in northeast China, northeast Japan, southeast Korea, and north Taiwan, to compare the influence of social context and family structure on individuals throughout the life course.

Jung-Hwa Ha

Visiting Research Scholar

Center on Contemporary China

Jung-Hwa Ha is an associate professor in the Department of Social Welfare at Seoul National University. She received her Ph.D. in Social Work and Sociology at University of Michigan. Her research interests include widowhood, social support, end-of life care and cognitive aging. At Princeton, she will conduct research on the impact of cognitive impairment and childlessness on older adults’ wellbeing in China and the U.S. She teaches courses on aging, disability and end-of-life issues.  

Sadaf Jaffer

Sadaf Jaffer

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 168

609-258-2423

sjaffer@princeton.edu

Sadaf Jaffer is a scholar of South Asian, Islamic and gender studies. She aims to understand Muslim communities by looking beyond religious authorities to shapers of film, literary, and popular culture. She is currently working on a book entitled Lady Genghis Khan: Ismat Chughtai, Progressive Literature and Secularism in Modern India, which offers new perspectives on Islam in India through the lens of celebrated Urdu writer and cultural critic Ismat Chughtai. Jaffer is also conducting research for a second book project on South Asian social media. Based on preliminary research, she has published a reflection paper in the Journal of Women’s History entitled “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Towards a Feminist Intellectual History” in which she explores the ways women use dynamic online texts to emphasize national belonging to Pakistan while rejecting Islam as promulgated by the state. Jaffer is a graduate of Georgetown's School of Foreign Service and earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University. She recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Global Studies at Stanford University.

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