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Perry Carter

Perry Carter

Politics Department

415a Robertson Hall

pjcarter@princeton.edu

G4

Research Interests: Historical Legacies, Politics of Territory, Identity Politics, Social Networks, Vote Buying

Perry Carter is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. His research concentrates on the intersection of international and domestic politics, drawing on with a particular focus on the role played by transnational group identities in post-imperial contexts. His dissertation examines the consequences of territorial loss for the structure of domestic politics, using a mixed-methods approach based on a combination of formal decision modelling, survey and laboratory experiments, geographical causal identification, and field and archival work in Georgia and the Caucasus to establish links between individual behavior and system-level outcomes. Other ongoing projects explore the role of social structure in determining the incentives politicians face to subvert formal election rules through vote-buying and patronage, and the relationship between economic vulnerability and group identification in political cognition.

Prior to Princeton, Perry worked as a professional bassoonist, performing solo and with orchestras and ensembles throughout New Zealand. He holds two BA (Hons) degrees from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, with majors in International Relations, Russian Language, and Music. 

Dissertation Title: The Politics of Loss

Isabelle DeSisto

Isabelle DeSisto

Politics Department

Fisher Hall, B-07

id1983@princeton.edu

G1

Isabelle is a PhD student in Politics. She holds a BA in Government and an MA in Regional Studies: Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia from Harvard University and an MPhil in Politics and International Studies from the University of Cambridge. Her primary research interests include social movements, migration, and regime types in Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Dissertation Title or Topic: TBD

Fedor Karmanov

karmanov@princeton.edu

G4

Bio/Research interests: Fedor Karmanov is a joint doctoral candidate in the English Department and the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in the Humanities. His dissertation, tentatively titled "Simultaneity: Multiple Invention in the Arts," attempts to understand why certain artistic forms, techniques, and genres emerge independently—in different languages and countries—at the same time. Prior to coming to Princeton, Fedor earned his B.A. and M.A. in English from McGill University.

Dissertation Title "Simultaneity: Multiple Invention in the Arts”

Aurora Ling

Aurora Ling

Politics Department

001 Fisher Hall

asling@princeton.edu

G3

Bio/Research interests: Aurora's research interests pertain to international human rights, religious conflict, mass atrocities, vaccine diplomacy, and soft power. Her regions of focus are Russia and China.

Dissertation Title or Topic: Aurora's dissertation topic is about religion as a political actor in mass atrocities (terrorism, genocide).

Laura E. Matthews

lauraec@princeton.edu

G6

Research interests: pedagogical theory and educational reform in 19th century Russia; the role of literature and the literary community in shaping educational discourse and practice; language politics in educational reforms; the image of teachers in literature; the moral responsibility of educators; “Russianness”, national identity, and the purpose(s) of education in 19th century Russia. 

Other interests: curriculum design, critical pedagogy, culturally responsive teaching, language pedagogy, migration, refugee rights, and ballet. 

Dissertation topic: The Muse of Pedagogy: Metaphors of Education in 19th Century Russian Literature

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