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The Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS), in conjunction with the Office of International Programs and the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs and Operations launched the 2020 edition of Princeton University’s international magazine, “Princeton International.”

Thursday January 07

The Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS), in conjunction with the Office of International Programs and the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs and Operations launched the 2020 edition of Princeton University’s international magazine, “Princeton International.”
Left: Shoshana Goldstein. Right: A domestic worker in a high rise in Gurugram. Photo by Shoshana Goldstein

Wednesday December 02

Shoshana Goldstein has been selected as the recipient of the inaugural Princeton | Places Urban Imagination Prize. Her project, “The Urban Exodus: Mobility Justice for India’s Migrants in the Age of Covid-19,” will tell the story of the longstanding inequities suffered by migrant workers in Gurugram, and how these have been intensified in the face of the global pandemic.
Through a series of courses taught in conjunction with a worldwide network of partner institutions, Princeton’s Global History Lab (GHL) aims to foster truly global conversations among learners hailing from diverse backgrounds. Pictured: A student in the InZone Learning Hub located in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya participates in the open-access, online course “A History of the World,” also offered as an undergraduate history course at Princeton, taught by GHL founder Jeremy Adelman, the Henry Charles Lea Pr

Tuesday December 01

Since 2012, GHL has offered its flagship online, open-access course, “A History of the World,” to learners around the world.The course situates the study of global history in a global classroom, encouraging students to learn from and through interactions with peers near and far. Among those peers are refugee and migrant learners in Africa, Europe and the Middle East — making the course an innovative experiment in humanitarian higher education, and fulfilling Princeton’s commitment to be “in the service of humanity.”

Tuesday September 29

On Wednesday, September 23, Harold James, the Claude and Lore Kelly Professor in European Studies and professor of history and international affairs, and Andrew Moravcsik, professor of politics and international affairs and director of the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination, met over Zoom to discuss the effects of the American presidential election on European politics.
Stephen Cohen, professor emeritus of politics at Princeton University and a historian of Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, died on September 18, 2020.

Monday September 21

Stephen Cohen, professor emeritus of politics at Princeton University and a historian of Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, died on September 18, 2020.
The American-Scandinavian Foundation announced the winners of its 39th annual Translation Competition for outstanding translations of poetry, fiction, drama, or literary prose written by a Nordic author born after 1900 and awarded Larissa Kyzer, Princeton University’s fall 2019 Translator in Residence, the Nadia Christensen Prize for her translation of an excerpt from Elín, ýmislegt ("A Fist or a Heart") by Icelandic author Kristín Eiríksdóttir.

Friday September 18

The American-Scandinavian Foundation announced the winners of its 39th annual Translation Competition for outstanding translations of poetry, fiction, drama, or literary prose written by a Nordic author born after 1900 and awarded Larissa Kyzer, Princeton University’s fall 2019 Translator in Residence, the Nadia Christensen Prize for her translation of an excerpt from Elín, ýmislegt ("A Fist or a Heart") by Icelandic author Kristín Eiríksdóttir.
“Human Rights Half Measures: Avoiding Accountability in Postwar Sri Lanka,” by Kate Cronin-Furman, lecturer in human rights at University College London, first published in the January 2020 issue of "World Politics," was awarded the 2020 APSA Human Rights Section Best Paper award.

Friday September 11

“Human Rights Half Measures: Avoiding Accountability in Postwar Sri Lanka,” by Kate Cronin-Furman, lecturer in human rights at University College London, first published in the January 2020 issue of "World Politics," was awarded the 2020 APSA Human Rights Section Best Paper award.
Jhumpa Lahiri, director of Princeton University’s Program in Creative Writing, leads her spring 2020 course, “Advanced Fiction: Imitating Italians,” prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The course relied heavily on translated texts and considered the limitations of translation. Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Tuesday September 08

Jhumpa Lahiri, director of Princeton University’s Program in Creative Writing, leads her spring 2020 course, “Advanced Fiction: Imitating Italians,” prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The course relied heavily on translated texts and considered the limitations of translation.
“Bridging the Gap: Lottery-Based Procedures in Early Parliamentarization,” by Alexandra Cirone, an assistant professor in the Department of Government at Cornell University, and Brenda Van Coppenolle, a lecturer in the Department of Government at the University of Essex, first published in the April 2019 issue of World Politics, was awarded an honorable mention for the 2020 APSA Mary Parker Follett prize.

Thursday September 03

“Bridging the Gap: Lottery-Based Procedures in Early Parliamentarization,” by Alexandra Cirone, an assistant professor in the Department of Government at Cornell University, and Brenda Van Coppenolle, a lecturer in the Department of Government at the University of Essex, first published in the April 2019 issue of World Politics, was awarded an honorable mention for the 2020 APSA Mary Parker Follett prize.
Leonard Wantchekon   Photo courtesy of Leonard Wantchekon

Thursday August 20

In 2014, Princeton professor Leonard Wantchekon opened the doors to what is now one of the top-ranked economics programs in Africa. Today, the African School of Economics (ASE), with campuses in Benin and Côte d’Ivoire, offers several undergraduate degrees, four master’s degrees, a Ph.D. program and a pre-doctoral program, all aimed at providing “a greater voice to African researchers and entrepreneurs in the debate over the continent’s development.” Now, Wantchekon, a professor of politics and international affairs, is bringing his experience building academic pipelines in Africa to universities in the United States.