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Princeton University seniors Lavinia Liang, Katie Tyler and Erika Ward have been awarded the Henry Richardson Labouisse ’26 Prize to pursue international civic engagement projects for one year following graduation.  Photo by Mark Czajkowski

Monday April 09

Princeton University seniors Lavinia Liang, Katie Tyler and Erika Ward have been awarded the Henry Richardson Labouisse ’26 Prize to pursue international civic engagement projects for one year following graduation.
Anastassia Obydenkova, Vinícius Rodrigues Vieira, Jürgen Schaflechner and Sjoerd van Tuinen were awarded financial grants by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) Fung Global Network Fund, an initiative designed to facilitate research, writing and collaboration among current and former Fung Global Fellows and Princeton University faculty members and scholars.

Wednesday March 28

Anastassia Obydenkova, Vinícius Rodrigues Vieira, Jürgen Schaflechner and Sjoerd van Tuinen were awarded financial grants by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) Fung Global Network Fund, an initiative designed to facilitate research, writing and collaboration among current and former Fung Global Fellows and Princeton University faculty members and scholars.
In class, junior Brittany Smith discusses the impact of labor policies on illegal immigrants in the United States.  Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Monday March 26

As a capstone to the fall course “The Ethics of Borders and Migration,” 11 Princeton undergraduates and one graduate student traveled north to Buffalo, New York, to learn about the city’s refugee resettlement efforts.
A new fellowship program, administered by Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS), will award funding to two qualified Princeton Ph.D. students who are conducting field work outside the United States, especially in or related to China, during the 2018-19 academic year.

Tuesday March 20

A new fellowship program, administered by Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS), will award funding to two qualified Princeton Ph.D. students who are conducting field work outside the United States, especially in or related to China, during the 2018-19 academic year.
 From left: Three of the co-authors on the new paper, 2017 Princeton Ph.D. graduate Lee Mordechai, Georgetown University’s Tim Newfield, and Princeton’s John Haldon discuss research questions at the May 2017 Climate Change and History Research Initiative colloquium. Haldon created CCHRI to bring historians into dialogue with climate change researchers and archaeologists, to bring nuance to the discussion of how societies react to environmental stress.  Photo by Vered Rekanati

Monday March 19

History can tell us a lot about environmental upheaval, say Princeton historians John Haldon and Lee Mordechai. What is missing in today’s debate about climate change is using what we know about how past societies handled environmental stresses to help inform our own situation.  
Nine outstanding juniors have been named the 2018 cohort of PIIRS Undergraduate Fellows. Photo by Mark Czajkowski

Friday March 09

Nine outstanding juniors have been named the 2018 cohort of PIIRS Undergraduate Fellows.
The Simpson International Building is home to Princeton University’s international initiatives, included the new M.S. Chadha Center for Global India. Photo by Steven Freeman

Monday February 26

A gift from Sumir Chadha of Princeton’s Class of 1993 has established the M.S. Chadha Center for Global India at Princeton University, which will bring together scholars and students from all disciplines to broadly explore contemporary India, including its economy, politics and culture. The center is named in honor of Chadha’s grandfather, a distinguished physician who served as the director general of Health Services for India.
John “Newby” Parton. Photo by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications

Tuesday February 20

Princeton seniors John “Newby” Parton and Maggie Pecsok have been named co-winners of the University’s 2018 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate.
Princeton senior Ugonna Nwabueze, a first-generation Nigerian American, has undertaken two creative thesis projects — an original play and a production of the play “Eclipsed,” in which she played a leading role — to meet the requirements for her English major and certificates in African studies, African American studies and theater. Photo byDenise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Tuesday February 20

Princeton senior Ugonna Nwabueze’s development of the production of “Eclipsed”— which included an unforgettable trip to West Africa to conduct interviews of her own — is for her certificates in theater and African studies.
Senior Thomas Clark, who won first place in the A Window on Eurasia category, said of his photograph, “Hospice”: “Rajnal, originally from Pakistan, volunteers at a state-run hospice in Vladivostok, [Russia]. His jobs include feeding the residents and speaking with them. Here, he speaks to Lyubov, an 80-year-old native of Vladivostok. She has never married and has no children, so she rarely has visitors.” Photo byMark Czajkowski

Monday February 12

Each February, the International Eye Photo Contest provides an opportunity for students who have studied, worked, researched or serviced abroad to share their memories and experiences.