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Buchholz dispels misconceptions about American Sign Language translation

Noah Buchholz
Thursday, January 9, 2020

On Monday, Sep. 23, Noah Buchholz, a Ph.D. candidate at Princeton Theological Seminary and a lecturer in linguistics at Princeton University, presented “From Spoken to Signed: American Sign Language Translation,” on misconceptions about American Sign Language (ASL), as part of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication’s weekly lunchtime lecture series.

ASL is a language with its own grammar and vocabulary distinct from English, explained Buchholz and described ASL as “visual and kinesthetic.” ASL-English translation, according to Buchholz, consists of dynamic exchanges between not only two different languages, but also two different modalities. In his lecture, Buchholz also discussed the critical role ASL-English translation plays in the advocacy for Deaf people’s rights. 

Buchholz is an ASL-English translator, certified Deaf interpreter and performing artist. Previously, he served as assistant professor of ASL and Deaf studies at Bethel College, in Mishawaka, Indiana.

Buchholz dispels misconceptions about American Sign Language translation 1:17:16