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A world without the Amazon? Safeguarding the Earth’s largest rainforest is focus of Princeton conference

The conference “Amazonian Leapfrogging: Long-term Vision for Safeguarding the Amazon for Brazil and the Planet” at Princeton Oct. 17-18 offered an opportunity to discuss an alternative vision for the Brazilian Amazon, which is threatened by illegal deforestation, fires and socioeconomic inequality. Shown from left: Beto Veríssimo, a Brazil LAB scholar and co-founder and senior researcher of the nonprofit Imazon; Ilona Szabó, director of the think-and-do-tank Igarapé; Michael Celia, the Theodora Shelton Pitn
Tuesday, October 29, 2019

The Amazon is the world’s largest and most diverse tropical forest and the ancestral home of over 1 million indigenous peoples. How to preserve it was the centrally urgent theme at a conference at Princeton on Oct. 17-18.

“Safeguarding the Amazon and its rich bio-social diversity and environmental services for Brazil and the planet is a key mandate for our times,” said João Biehl, the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology and director of the Brazil LAB at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Affairs (PIIRS), in his opening remarks. “It necessitates our very best ideas and practices.”

The conference, “Amazonian Leapfrogging: Long-term Vision for Safeguarding the Amazon for Brazil and the Planet,” offered a platform for Princeton scholars and Brazilian scientists, environmental and indigenous leaders, policy experts, artists, business innovators, and social entrepreneurs to discuss an alternative vision for the Brazilian Amazon, currently threatened by illegal deforestation, fires and socioeconomic inequality.

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