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Visiting Scholars

African Humanities

Meg Arenberg

Meg Arenberg

Postdoctoral Research Associate, African Humanities

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 166

609-258-4851

arenberg@princeton.edu

Arenberg recently completed her Ph.D. in comparative literature at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her primary research interests focus on multilingual African fiction, poetry and drama of the 20th and 21st centuries, intertextuality between Afrophone and Europhone African literatures and literary translation. While at Princeton she will be preparing a book manuscript on the interrelationship of language ideology, literary form and African identities in contemporary East African literature across the generic spectrum. Her work has been published in Research in African Literatures and is forthcoming in PMLA and East African Literary and Cultural Studies. Arenberg also translates from Swahili language and is currently at work on an English translation of Zanzibari poet Mohammed Ghassani’s award-winning collection, N’na Kwetu. 

Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China

Jiaju Chen

Visiting PhD Student

Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

354 Wallace Hall

jiajuc@princeton.edu

Jiaju’s primary responsibilities will be to participate in and contribute to Professor Xie’s project on social mobility and stratification. Jiaju’s credentials and interests are well aligned with the needs of the project. She is a Ph.D student working toward her degree in Population, Resources and Environmental Economics at Renmin University of China. Her research interests focus on fertility, aging, and population policymaking. She will also benefit professionally from the research experience and the contacts she will develop by working with us.

Hao Dong

Hao Dong

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

haodong@princeton.edu

Hao Dong earned his Ph.D. and MPhil in social science from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and LLB in Sociology from Zhejiang University. His research interests include social demography, family and kinship, and social mobility and inequality. In his recent works, he makes use of five recently available longitudinal datasets of some 4 million observations of 650,000 individuals, who lived between 18th and mid-20th century in northeast China, northeast Japan, southeast Korea, and north Taiwan, to compare the influence of social context and family structure on individuals throughout the life course.

Jung-Hwa Ha

Visiting Scholar

Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

361 Wallace

609 258-3660

junhwah@princeton.edu

Jung-Hwa Ha is an associate professor in the Department of Social Welfare at Seoul National University in South Korea. She received her Ph.D. in Social Work and Sociology from University of Michigan. Her research interests include widowhood, social support, end-of life care, and cognitive aging. At Princeton, she will conduct research on the impact of cognitive impairment and childlessness on older adults’ wellbeing in China. She will also engage in a collaborative project with Drs. Bussarawan Teerawichitchainan (in Singapore) and John Knodel (in Thailand), comparing the implications of childlessness among older adults across East and Southeast Asia. At her home university, she teaches courses on aging, disability, and end-of-life care issues.

Quanbao Jiang

Visiting Professor

Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

359 Wallace Hall

qjiang@princeton.edu

Quanbao Jiang's general research interests include demographic analysis and public policy, sex structure imbalance and its consequences. Based on his previous work, he will work on the following two points during the academic visit at the Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China.  The first is to examine the decline in China’s fertility level with decomposition method, and will devise decomposition formula to decompose the decline in fertility during the past several decades into the quantum effect (measured by marital fertility rate) and the tempo effect (measured by age-specific marriage proportion), as well as sex structure and age composition. The other is to examine to what extent sex-selective abortion contributes to China’s high sex ratio with Bayesian analysis. He received his PhD in Management Science and Engineering at the Xi’An Jiaotong University in 2006.

Lei Shi

Visiting PhD Student

Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

356 Wallace Hall

slei@princeton.edu

Lei Shi's current research interest is occupational mobility. A wide range of new organizational forms have emerged in China because of the large-scale institutional changes since 1980s, such as multinational corporations, private enterprises, joint venture enterprises, and etc. The rapid growing numbers of occupational types give individuals more chances to achieve occupational mobility. That is to say, occupational mobility not only refers to personal life experience, but is also influenced by the power of organizational and social structure. In brief, individuals’ occupational mobility is a synthetical result of personal rational option at the micro-level as well as the effect of organizational and social structure at the macro-level.  He graduated from Renmin University in Sociology in 2016.

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Democracy & Development

Gustavo Flores-Macias

Visiting Research Scholar

Democracy and Development

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 164B

609-258-2302

gustavof@princeton.edu

Flores-Macias is currently an asoociate professor at Cornell University. His research and teaching interests include a variety of topics related to political and economic development. Currently, his research focuses on two main areas: 1) the politics of economic reform, and 2) taxation and state capacity. Work related to these interests has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, Comparative Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Democracy, Journal of Politics, Peace Review, Political Science Quarterly, Studies in Comparative International Development, and as chapters in edited volumes. My book, After Neoliberalism? The Left and Economic Reforms in Latin America (Oxford University Press 2012), studies the economic policies of left-of-center governments in Latin America, focusing on the role that party systems play in facilitating or hindering economic transformations. The book won the Latin American Studies Association Tomassini Award in 2014. Ph.D. in political science from Georgetown University.

Fung Global Program

Guillaume Calafat

Fung Global Fellow

Fung Global Fellows Program - Fall 2018

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 149A

gcalafat@princeton.edu

Calafat is an associate professor (Maître de Conférences) of early modern history at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne in France. He received his Ph.D in history from University of Paris 1 and University of Pisa. His research interests focus on commercial and maritime law in the Mediterranean during the Early Modern period. His monograph, entitled Une mer jalousée. Souverainetés et juridictions des mers dans la Méditerranée du XVIIe siècle, addresses a fierce 17th century legal, political and erudite controversy surrounding the status of the Mediterranean sea and concepts such as sovereignty, empire, jurisdiction, occupation and protection. During his time as a Fung Fellow, Calafat will examine the economic, social, political and diplomatic relationships between Ottoman North Africa and Western Europe during the early modern period. 

Meng-Hsuan Chou

Fung Global Fellow

Fung Global Fellows Program - Fall 2018

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 149B

mc56@princeton.edu

Chou is an assistant professor of public policy and global affairs in the School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. She received her PhD in Politics and International Studies from the University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on the transformation of the state through inter-state and inter-regional policy cooperation in areas of contemporary salience such as migration, academic mobility, and higher education. During her stay in Princeton, Chou will compare the rise, evolution, and the effects of higher education regionalisms in Europe and in Southeast Asia, as well as between these two regions. In so doing, she will explain how changing higher education practices, politics, and policies weave a web of interdependence and unveil new power dynamics between actors in distinct world regions.

  

 

Tolga Demiryol

Fung Global Fellow

Fung Global Fellows Program - Fall 2018

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 150

demiryol@princeton.edu

Demiryol is an associate professor of political science at Altinbas University, Istanbul. He received his Ph.D. in Politics from the University of Virginia, specializing in political economy. His recent research focuses on the geopolitical implications of economic interdependence, with an emphasis on regional energy trade. At Princeton, Tolga will study how states use geo-economic tools to realize foreign policy objectives in an increasingly interdependent economic order. Tolga’s project will analyze the economic instruments of Turkey’s foreign policy since 2002. The findings of this research can enhance our view of the geo-economics of regional powers as well as the limits of interdependence as a source of inter-state cooperation.

Rita Kesselring

Fung Global Fellow

Fung Global Fellows Program - Fall 2018

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 151

rk20@princeton.edu

Kesselring is senior lecturer at the Chair of Social Anthropology, University of Basel, Switzerland where she also received her Ph.D. Her work focuses on the body and lived experience vis-à-vis dominant discourses, the built environment and global inequalities. Her monograph, Bodies of Truth: Law, Memory and Emancipation, is an ethnography on apartheid victims in South Africa and globally entangled system of human rights abuses and looks at the possibilities and limits of social change after decades of structural violence. She is co-editor of the journal Anthropology Southern Africa and leader of the project "Valueworks: Effects of Financialisation along the Copper Value Chain". At Princeton, she will work on a book manuscript on new mining towns in Zambia’s Northwestern Province, making visible the interconnection between global extractivism, commodity trade and urban life at the site of resource extraction.

Joseph Prestel

Fung Global Fellow

Fung Global Fellows Program - Fall 2018

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 152A

jprestel@princeton.edu

Prestel is an assistant professor of history at Freie Universität Berlin in Germany. He received his Ph.D. in history from Freie Universität Berlin. His research focuses on the histories of Europe and the Middle East during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as on global and urban history. Entitled Emotional Cities: Debates on Urban Change in Berlin and Cairo, 1860-1910, his first monograph analyzes the emergence of similar arguments about city dwellers’ emotions in Berlin and Cairo during the second half of the nineteenth century. At Princeton, he will work on a project that examines the ties between Palestinian groups and the West German radical left during the 1960s and 1970s.

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Migration Research Community

Noelle Brigden

Visiting Associate Research Scholar

Migration Research Community

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 159

609-258-6443

nbrigden@princeton.edu

Noelle Brigden is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Marquette University, where she teaches courses on international relations, human security and migration. She previously held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University. During her research on the violence and uncertainty that confronts Central American migrants in transit, she conducted over two years of fieldwork along unauthorized routes in El Salvador, Mexico and the United States. Her research has received funding from the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the Fulbright Garcia-Robles program, the Bucerius Program at the Zeit-Stiftung and the Einaudi Center for International Studies and the Institute for Social Science at Cornell University. She has published in International Studies Quarterly, Geopolitics, Migration Politics and Antipode, and her work is forthcoming in Mobilities. Her current research project maps the im/mobilities produced by gang borders in El Salvador to theorize globalization and the reordering of the nation-state through the lived spatial orientation of people. She earned her Ph.D. in Government at Cornell University.

David Cortez

Post-doctoral Research Associate

Migration Research Community

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 160

609-258-7217

dcortez@princeton.edu

David Cortez is a recent Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Cornell University.  His research centers on ethnic and racial identity, with particular focus on intersectional and situational identity salience.  At Princeton, he will be preparing a book manuscript in which he explores the emergence of a disproportionately Latinx immigration law enforcement workforce as a metaphor for the minority experience in the United States.  Drawing on extensive ethnographic fieldwork, including interviews with and observations of one-hundred Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents across Texas, Arizona, and California, his research engages questions of belonging, obligation, and liminality to reveal the careful negotiation of cross-cutting social group memberships of Latinx immigration agents caught between two worlds: the police and the policed.

Loren Landau

Visiting Research Scholar

Migration Research Community

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 158

609-258-9864

llandau@princeton.edu

Loren B. Landau is the South African Research Chair in Human Mobility and the Politics of Difference at the African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg where he was the founding director. He has previously held visiting and faculty positions at Georgetown University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. His work explores human mobility, belonging, and transformations of political authority. He has served as the chair of the Consortium for Refugees and Migrants in South Africa (CoRMSA), as a member of the South African Immigration Advisory Board, and is on the editorial boards of Society & Space; International Migration Review, Migration Studies, and the Journal of Refugee Studies. Widely published in the academic and popular press, he is author of The Humanitarian Hangover: Displacement, Aid, and Transformation in Western Tanzania (Wits Press); co-editor of Forging African Communities: Mobility, Integration, and Belonging (Palgrave); All Who Live In It: Personal Stories of Migration, Xenophobia and Disillusionment in South Africa’s Metropolis (Forthcoming, Wits Press); Contemporary Migration to South Africa (World Bank); and editor of Exorcising the Demons Within: Xenophobia, Violence and Statecraft in Contemporary South Africa (UN University Press/Wits Press). Among others, he has published in Urban Studies; Millennium, Politics & Society; and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. He holds an MSc in Development Studies (LSE) and a PhD in Political Science (Berkeley) and has consulted with the Cities Alliance, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, South African Human Rights Commission, the UNDP, the UNHCR, the World Bank, Oxfam, and others.  

South Asian Studies

Sadaf Jaffer

Sadaf Jaffer

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 168

609-258-2423

sjaffer@princeton.edu

Sadaf Jaffer is a scholar of South Asian, Islamic and gender studies. She aims to understand Muslim communities by looking beyond religious authorities to shapers of film, literary, and popular culture. She is currently working on a book entitled Lady Genghis Khan: Ismat Chughtai, Progressive Literature and Secularism in Modern India, which offers new perspectives on Islam in India through the lens of celebrated Urdu writer and cultural critic Ismat Chughtai. Jaffer is also conducting research for a second book project on South Asian social media. Based on preliminary research, she has published a reflection paper in the Journal of Women’s History entitled “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Towards a Feminist Intellectual History” in which she explores the ways women use dynamic online texts to emphasize national belonging to Pakistan while rejecting Islam as promulgated by the state. Jaffer is a graduate of Georgetown's School of Foreign Service and earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University. She recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Global Studies at Stanford University.

Visiting Faculty

Sunil Khilnani

Visiting Professor

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Office 141

609-258-8125

khilnani@princeton.edu

Khilnani is a professor of politics and director of the King's College London India Institute. He is a scholar of Indian history and politics best known as the author of The Idea of India (1997). He was the presenter of a BBC Radio 4 series entitled "Incarnations: India in 50 Lives," which was later published as a book in 2016. He was a 2010 Berlin Prize Fellow, and he is a recipient of the Indian government's 2005 Pravasi Bharatiya Samman award.

Visiting Lecturer

Christiana Agawu

Christiana Agawu is a sociologist with international development experience in education, health, and the environment, who has taught at the university level in the United States and in Ghana. She joined the faculty of the Program in African Studies in 2009.

Srinivas Bangalore

Srinivas Bangalore is the director of AI research technologies at Interactions LLC. He was a lead inventive scientist at Interactions and a principal research scientist at AT&T Labs. He has a Ph.D in Computer Science from University of Pennsylvania and has made significant contributions to many areas of natural language processing, including spoken language translation, multimodal understanding, language generation and question-answering. He has co-edited three books on supertagging, natural language generation and language translation, has authored over a 100 research publications and holds over 100 patents in these areas. Bangalore has been an adjunct associate professor at Columbia University, a visiting professor at Princeton University and Otto Monstead Professor at Copenhagen Business School.

David Moak

David Moak

David Moak is a historian of eighteenth and nineteenth century France. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University, where he defended his dissertation, entitled "La capitale d'hiver: Tourism, Consumer Capitalism and Urban Transformation in Nice (1760-1860)."