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Program in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies

Undergraduate Opportunities

Through the Program in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, undergraduates can pursue two tracks for the certificate program as well as apply for funding for further study. 

General Requirements

Students must meet the following requirements by the end of his or her sophomore year to be eligible for admission to the certificate program.

  • Satisfactory completion of the established requirements for admission to one of the cooperating departments or to a department whose plan of study may be combined with this interdepartmental program.
  • Initiation of study of the Russian language or other target language. Students without previous training in Russian are advised to begin their study not later than the first term of the sophomore year and earlier, if possible.
  • A student choosing to pursue a certificate, must complete the normal requirements in his or her department as well as the following requirements of the program. The proposed course of study must be approved each term by the director.
  • To obtain the certificate, students must choose one of the two tracks currently offered by the program: Russian and Eurasian (RES) and East European Cultures and Societies (EECS). 

The RES Track Requirements

Coursework

The certificate requires students to complete four regular courses (two 200-level courses and two 300-level courses) in the following disciplines:

  • History: One upper-level course on the history of the Russian empire, the Soviet Union, or Eurasia.
  • Literature: One upper-level course in the literatures of the Russia and/or Eurasia.
  • Social Sciences: One course in the anthropology, sociology, politics and/or economics of Russia and/or Eurasia.
  • Plus 1: One additional course from the three main subject areas or from a list of preapproved specialty courses.
Language Requirement

Expertise in a core language of Eurasia is central to the program. Applicable languages include Russian or Turkish. Students whose primary language of study is Russian must successfully complete one Russian language course beyond 207 or otherwise achieve this level of competence. Students in the program whose focus is Turkish must complete the equivalent of the second year in that language. Native speakers and students with previous training in any of the languages of Eurasia can fulfill the language requirement by passing a placement test.

Senior Thesis

A senior thesis or junior paper in the student's home department related to Eastern Europe. Students should consult with the REEES director for approval of their independent work plans.

The EECS Track Requirements 

Coursework

The certificate requires students to complete one gateway course and four regular courses

The four courses can be chosen from the fields of literature, art, history, anthropology, politics, economics (two courses in one of these fields are permitted if a student concentrates in that field). The gateway course will be the Eastern European survey course, offered every second year. Students can concentrate in any subject that would cover more than one country of the region. (Specializing in one country is acceptable with the approval of the program director.) These courses cannot be counted for more than one certificate program.

Language Requirement 

Expertise in a core language of Eastern Europe is central to the program. The language component of the track requires one year of any language of the region. Applicable languages include Czech, Polish, Romanian, Bulgarian, and Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian. Native speakers and students with previous training in any of the languages of Eurasia can fulfill the language requirement by demonstrating intermediate proficiency on a placement examination.

Senior Thesis 

A senior thesis or junior paper in the student's home department related to Eastern Europe. Students should consult with the  REEES director for approval of their independent work plans.

Senior Thesis Prize

A prize is awarded to the best senior paper that relates to Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies.

Senior Thesis Prize winners:

2016 Olivia Bowins, History Department
Ukrainian Nation-building and Regional Identities: An Ideational Dilemma in Crimea and Transcarpathia

2015 Jake Robertson, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Captive Audiences: The Untold Stories of Professional Theater in the Gulag Camps of the Komi Republic

2010 Andrew T. Davis, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Syntax in Aleksandr Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin: A Statistical and Interpretive Approach

2009 Ilya Alex Blanter, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
Russia’s Black Sea Fleet in Sevastopol:  Democratic Transition and the Politics of Irredentism

2008 Kayvon Michael Tehranian, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs|
The Political Economy of Natural Gas Cartelization.  Will the GECF evolve into a natural gas version of OPEC?

2007 Andriy Mykhaylovskyy, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
Land and Corruption:  A Case Study of Crimean Tatar Squatting

2006 Andrew E. Fornarola, Politics
Walking Alone:  The Curious Absence of a Liberal Youth Movement in Russia

Monty Raiser Fund '92 Fund

The Program in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies supports supports summer study of third, fourth or fifth year Russian language; cultural/political research; and internships in Russia, thanks to the generosity of the Monty Raiser '92 Fund.  

The Monty Raiser '92 Fund was established in 1993 in memory of R. Montgomery Raiser III, a Princeton student who had a strong interest in Russian affairs. 

Questions?

Contact Carole Frantzen, program manager, or call 609-258-5978.