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Alisha Holland, associate professor in the Department of Government at Harvard University, was awarded the 2020 Seligson Prize for her paper “Diminished Expectations: Redistributive Preferences in Truncated Welfare States,” first published in World Politics in October 2018.

Thursday June 11

Alisha Holland, associate professor in the Department of Government at Harvard University, was awarded the 2020 Seligson Prize for her paper “Diminished Expectations: Redistributive Preferences in Truncated Welfare States,” first published in World Politics in October 2018.
The Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities (PMI) has named Shoshana Goldstein, Sophie Hochhäusl, Adrián Lerner Patrón, and Halimat Somotan as Princeton Mellon Fellows for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Tuesday June 02

The Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities (PMI) has named Shoshana Goldstein, Sophie Hochhäusl, Adrián Lerner Patrón, and Halimat Somotan as Princeton Mellon Fellows for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Monday May 18

As part of the spring course "Critical African Studies," five seniors graduating with a certificate in African studies created a podcast, "Coronawatch," which reviewed the history of pandemics on the African continent, the current reach of COVID-19, responsed by local and global actors, and the economic impact of this public health crisis. 

Thursday May 14

On Thursday, May 7, the Fung Global Fellows Program addressed the challenges of imagining internationalism and solidarity in the global context of the coronavirus pandemic. 
Undergraduate students (from left) Keely Toledo, Joseph DiMarino, Jimin Kang and Alexander Krauel study materials in the Princeton University Library Special Collections before the start of remote instruction due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo byMark Czajkowski

Tuesday May 12

The spring course “Amazonia, The Last Frontier: History, Culture, and Power” transitioned to remote instruction after spring break due to the coronavirus pandemic. Earlier in the term, students had visited the Princeton University Library’s Special Collections to see several rare and unique items on the Amazon, and then, from off-site, they were able to access the materials digitally.
Princeton researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on people’s emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits of home gardening were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that household gardens could be key to providing food security in urban areas and making

Monday May 11

As civic leaders and urban planners work to make cities more sustainable and livable by investing in outdoor spaces and recreational activities such as biking and walking, Princeton researchers have identified the benefit of an activity largely overlooked by policymakers — home gardening.
The student organizers of Princeton University’s Africa Summit found a way to convene their community, in spite of the coronavirus pandemic, with an online discussion led by young entrepreneurs working to create positive change on the continent. 

Tuesday April 28

The student organizers of Princeton University’s Africa Summit found a way to convene their community, in spite of the coronavirus pandemic, with an online discussion led by young entrepreneurs working to create positive change on the continent. 
Princeton University is actively monitoring the situation around coronavirus (Covid-19) and the evolving guidance from government and health authorities, in keeping with our commitment to ensure the health and safety of all members of the University community.

Thursday March 12

PIIRS is cancelling its public (on campus) events for the remainder of March and April.
Michael Kleiner spoke about the challenges of translating from the classical Ethiopic as part of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communications’ weekly lunchtime lecture series. Reproduced by courtesy of the Princeton University Rare Books and Special Collections from Princeton Ethiopic Manuscript No. 65, image 21

Monday February 03

Michael Kleiner is a scholar and translator of African and Arabic texts at the University of Göttingen. He was a Visiting Stewart Fellow in the Department of Comparative Literature under the auspices of the Humanities Council at Princeton for the spring 2019 semester.
From left to right: Gabriela Oseguera Serra, Yousef Elzalabany and Matteo Parisi.

Monday January 13

Princeton seniors Gabriela Oseguera Serra and Yousef Elzalabany, and University of Oxford student Matteo Parisi have been named recipients of the Daniel M. Sachs Class of 1960 Graduating Scholarship, one of Princeton University’s highest awards.