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Brazil LAB launches collaboration with digital media outlet Nexo

The Brazil LAB recently partnered with the Brazilian digital media outlet Nexo. Founded in 2015 — and reaching over 1.6 million readers — Nexo is part of the Trust Project, a global consortium promoting the integrity and quality of news that includes, among others, BBC, The Economist and The Washington Post.   Credit: Araquém Alcântara
Monday, April 26, 2021

The Brazil LAB recently partnered with the Brazilian digital media outlet Nexo. Founded in 2015 — and reaching over 1.6 million readers — Nexo is part of the Trust Project, a global consortium promoting the integrity and quality of news that includes, among others, BBC, The Economist and The Washington Post.

The Brazil LAB will host a permanent page on Nexo's newly created Public Policies platform. Research will be published in multiple forms, including essays and public policy op-eds; podcast and video interviews; literature reviews; dissertation abstracts; and curated Q&As with researchers across a variety of fields. Aligning closely with the LAB's major research hubs, these publications will traverse a range of themes, including (but not limited to): conservation and indigenous knowledges in the Amazon; structural inequality and violence; the history of slavery and race relations in Brazil; human rights and legal mobilization; and emergent forms of cultural and artistic expression.

The Brazil LAB-Nexo initiative seeks to publicize the work of various generations of scholars at Princeton, as well as those of Brazil LAB affiliates and institutional partners, like the Graduate Program in Social Anthropology of the Museu Nacional (PPGAS-MN). "For the Brazil LAB, it is a great opportunity to disseminate its research findings,” said Marcelo Medeiros, visiting research scholar at Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) and the co-author of "Abortion is a Public Health Problem" with legal scholar and activist Gabriela Rondon. "It's a way of reaching a broader audience and will contribute to the debate about public policies in Brazil and comparatively."

Thomas Fujiwara, associate professor of economics and associate director of the Brazil LAB, added: "This exciting collaboration will help Princeton scholars to have an impact on public policy debates and hopefully inform alternative policymaking on pressing issues, such as the environmental crisis, authoritarianism and erosion of democratic institutions in Brazil and around the world, and social and economic inequalities exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic." Fujiwara authored "Brazil is a Vital Planetary Nexus" with João Biehl, the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology and director of the Brazil LAB, and Miqueias Mugge, associate research scholar and lecturer in PIIRS. 

The inaugural four publications also include "The Brazilian Supreme Court in the Face of Necropolitics" by Biehl, Lucas Prates, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology, and Joseph Amon, director of the Office of Global Health at Drexel University; and "Indigenous Amazonia Between Tracks and Tears," by anthropologist and PIIRS Global Scholar Carlos Fausto.

Three to five articles will be published monthly from within the Princeton community, in addition to contributions from the Brazil LAB’s various institutional partners. Initial publications will be in Portuguese, though availability in English and Spanish will be supported at a later time. “As the Brazil LAB both produces high-quality research and organizes high-impact events with multiple partners in the social sciences, humanities and the sciences, we have been challenged to amplify our dissemination efforts,” said Biehl. “Our partnership with Nexo also has strong pedagogical and political elements as it pushes younger and senior researchers to find creative ways of communicating evidence and harnessing our roles as engaged public scholars. Through this and other media and academic partnerships, the Brazil LAB will become an ever more active, strong, and creative nexus at PIIRS, on campus as well as in Brazil and throughout the Global South.”