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Visiting Scholars

Fung Global Fellows Program
View the visitors for 2022-23

Center on Contemporary China Visitors
View the visitors for 2022-23

May Kosba

May Kosba

Postdoctoral research associate

Program in African Studies

Treating the African novel as an archival site that produces knowledge and preserves cultural and historical memory, May Kosba's dissertation studies the concept of race through an imagining of modern Egypt as an African diasporic geography navigating the interlocking legacies of Islamization, Arabization, Western European colonialism and Ottoman rule. Her research and teaching center Black epistemological approaches on studying race to identify how religion, culture and politics inform nineteenth and twentieth century African writers’ representations of Egypt, and how they negotiate discourses on racial formation, slavery, Arabness and Blackness.  Dr. Kosba's Ph.D. is from Graduate Theological Union.

Harini Kumar

Harini Kumar

Postdoctoral research associate

M.S. Chadha Center for Global India

Harini Kumar is a postdoctoral research associate at the M.S. Chadha Center for Global India. She is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research focuses on Islam and Muslim societies in contemporary India. Her scholarship lies at the intersection of lived religion, kinship, gender, the built environment, and migration and mobility. Her current book project, “Formations of Tamil Islam: Belonging, Place, and Historical Consciousness in South India,” is an examination of Muslim belonging in Tamil-speaking South India. At Princeton, Harini will be working on a project called “Dissent: Power/less in India,” a cross-disciplinary initiative among Princeton specialists in South Asian Studies that seeks to explore the generation and negotiation of political vocabularies in a range of quotidian sites. Ph.D. University of Chicago.

K. Maya Larson

K. Maya Larson

ACLS Emerging Voices Postdoctoral Research Associate

Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication

K. Maya Larson is an ACLS Emerging Voices Fellow for the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication. Her research focuses on practices of censorship and subversive communications, primarily in nineteenth and twentieth-century Russia, with an emphasis on translation studies and antiracist literary scholarship.. Both her research and teaching span multiple media and draw on methods from history, gender studies, and philosophy. Maya’s articles have appeared in Comparative Literature, Deleuze and Guattari Studies, and Amaltea Journal of Myth Criticism. Her current book project uncovers how Aesop’s Vita shaped coded political critiques in Russian literature. Larson holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Oregon with a specialization in Translation Studies.

 

Anatoly Levshin

Associate research scholar

Reimagining World Order (RWO) research community

Anatoly (Tolya) Levshin research addresses two theoretical issues: 1) how historical evolution in patterns of material interdependence, especially violence interdependence, altered and continues to alter optimal strategies for exerting state power in international relations; and, 2) how the growth of institutional creativity interacts with changes in interdependence to stabilize or undermine international orders. His 2021 dissertation, “The Promise of a ‘Disentangling Alliance’: Collective Security and the Statecraft of Violence in the Age of Industrial Modernity,” is being prepared for publication. At the RWO, Levshin co-organizes the community’s feature podcast, World Order Colloquium, workshops, and annual conferences, and co-teaches its “Theories of International Order” seminar. Ph.D. Princeton University

Ute Mehnert

Ute Mehnert

Lecturer

European Politics and Society

Ute Mehnert is a historian and journalist. Apart from working as a lecturer of history at Princeton University, teaches German at Rider University and as a private tutor. Ph.D. Cologne University

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